Search

How and When to Upgrade Your Stick

Sticks are vital to learning lacrosse but can vary as athletes explore positions and develop. Choosing the right stick will set a player on the right path for success and save you some unnecessary expenses down the road.


Offense

Age

Under 10

10 and over

Recommendation

Youth sticks, 36-40 inches*

Full size sticks, 40-42 inches*

What to consider

Shorter sticks are easier for younger players to handle. For a smaller player or a player just getting started, these can be very beneficial for getting the hang of it.

You may still be able to use youth sticks in certain leagues; however, unless you are certain of that, it is safer to purchase a full-length stick. This also ensures that your stick will be legal to use for the next few years as well.

*Includes total length of the head and shaft

Tips for offense

  • If you are bigger for your age and feel comfortable, it is ok to play with a full-length stick.

  • Measurement length includes shaft and head – shafts without the head can be 26-30 for youth and 30 inches for adult / full-length shafts.


Defense

Defense is more nuanced as athletes will look to use a long pole to play defense as they get older. There’s no definitive age when this transition should occur, but here’s what we recommend for the average athlete. We encourage you to consult your local coach if you are unsure whether or not to purchase a long pole.

Age

Under 10

10 and over

Recommendation

Follow offensive recommendations above unless coach specifically recommends a long pole

Long poles, 72 inches* (may cut down if necessary)

What to consider

We often recommend a short pole as a player’s first stick, particularly if they are under the age of 10. Long poles can be tougher to handle for smaller players.

We recommend long poles for defenders as the position is more defined at this age.

*Includes total length of the head and shaft

Tips for defense

  • Trust your coach’s guidance regarding transitioning to long pole

  • Short sticks are cheaper, easier to get started with, and more universal. It makes more sense to start with a short pole and have a coach recommend you try out defense than the other way around.


A few last things…
  • One thing to note is that a long pole should be no more than a few inches taller than the athlete (with the head on it). If you order one that’s longer than that, feel free to cut it down.

  • If you are going to spend more money on a nice stick, you may want to consider purchasing one you can use for the next few years.

  • Join Gearosaur’s community for specific gear recommendations as your athlete develops in age and experience

0 comments